Notes from Hunter Creek

Notes From Hunter Creek

The Twenty-Sixth Amendment was passed in just under 4 months in 1971, quicker than any other Amendment, including the Twenty-First Amendment, which repealed the 18th (Prohibition) Amendment.    Why did the Twenty-Sixth Amendment demand such quick action? It prohibited the denial of voting Rights in any federal election to anyone 18 years or older. Soon…

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The 25th Amendment

The Twenty-Fifth Amendment After JFK’s assassination in 1963, many legislators believed that the issue of Presidential succession and disability needed greeter constitutional definition. First proposed in 1965, the Twenty-Fifth Amendment was ratified in 1967.  Under the amended language now in effect,  if a President became disabled, or resigned or was removed by impeachment, the Amendment…

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Notes from Hunter Creek

“The Twenty-Fourth Amendment”  Column 124  First proposed in 1962 and ratified during the Civil Rights era of 1964, the Twenty-Fourth Amendment prohibited Congress and the States from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections upon the payment of a poll tax or any other type of tax.  This right was later extended to state…

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“The 23rd Amendment” When this Amendment was first proposed in 1960, after strong bi-partisan support from both IKE and JFK during the early Civil Rights era, it was promptly ratified about 19 months later in 1961.        I do not believe that the 23rd Amendment could ever be added to the Constitution in…

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The Nineteenth Amendment

The Women’s Suffrage movement diligently worked for almost 80 years in establishing the Right to Vote without regard to gender.  In my opinion, along with the Bill of Rights, they are and were the most necessary constitutional amendments. Throughout Colonial America, women had historically possessed the right to vote and it was never an issue…

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Notes from Hunter Creek: The Eighteenth Amendment

By, Roger Wall Around 1900, a lot of right wing, conservative and anti-immigration forces were gradually uniting on the one issue they could all agree upon –– the abolition of alcohol for drink.  The language of the 18th Amendment reads as follows:  “Beginning in one year of ratification, the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating…

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Notes From Hunter Creek – The Seventeenth Amendment

By Roger Wall In 1787, at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the founders and delegates were attempting to replace the Articles of Confederation among the States with a new constitution The former document had suffered mightily without a strong executive branch, no independent judiciary and especially no central US banking system or any method to…

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Wall Column

The 16th Amendment Ah,  everyone’s favorite Amendment, right? You like to pay your fair share of your income to support the various public benefits that you receive or will receive in the future, right?   The federally supported Medicaid program has enough current funding to last only until the end of 2022. With baby boomers…

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Notes from Hunter Creek – Roger Wall

By Roger Wall The 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments These are collectively called the Civil Rights Amendments. All of them were initiated by Abraham Lincoln. All three were enacted after his assassination. A lot of presidential scholars select Lincoln as the second most significant US President, only preceded by George Washington.      The 13th…

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The Tenth Amendment

Alright all you “States Rights” people,  here’s your Amendment:  “The Powers not delegated to the U.S. by the Constitution nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.”   The Tenth Amendment This Amendment basically states a truism: that all is retained which has not been surrendered.…

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